Bethel School District Eugene OR

Malabon Health Room

Sun Safety Tips

Sun Safety Tips

Protecting your skin from the sun’s damaging rays is vital for a number of important health reasons. Here are the top ten steps you can take to protect your health:
• When possible, avoid outdoor activities during the hours between 10 AM and 4 PM, when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
• Always wear a broad-spectrum (protection against both UVA and UVB) sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 15 or higher.
• Be sure to reapply sunscreen frequently, especially after swimming, perspiring heavily or drying off with a towel.
• Wear a hat with a 4-inch brim all around because it protects areas often exposed to the sun, such as the neck, ears, eyes, forehead, nose, and scalp.
• Wear clothing to protect as much skin as possible. Long-sleeved shirts, long pants, or long skirts are the most protective. Dark colors provide more protection than light colors by preventing more UV rays from reaching your skin. A tightly woven fabric provides greater protection than loosely woven fabric.
• To protect your eyes from sun damage, wear sunglasses that block 99 to 100-percent of UVA and UVB radiation.
• Consider wearing cosmetics and lip protectors with an SPF of at least 15 to protect your skin year-round.
• Swimmers should remember to regularly reapply sunscreen. UV rays reflect off water and sand, increasing the intensity of UV radiation.
• Some medications, such as antibiotics, can increase your skin’s sensitivity to the sun. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information about the medications you are taking.
• Children need extra protection from the sun. One or two blistering sunburns before the age of 18 dramatically increases the risk of skin cancer. Encourage children to play in the shade, wear protective clothing and apply sunscreen regularly.

Source: American Cancer Society

Free Friday Dental Days in May

 

FREE Dental Care May 4thth and May 18th, 2018

FRIDAY DENTAL DAYS
Throughout the school year, Friday clinics will be scheduled for our student needs. This opportunity is brought to us by
White Bird Dental Clinic and Oregon Community Foundation


All Bethel students are eligible regardless of ability to pay.

To take advantage of this convenient and great service, forms are available at each school Health Room and at Bethel Health Center.

Fill out an application and return it to your school office. You will receive a call to schedule the appointment.

If you have health insurance, please bring your insurance card to the appointment.

If the hygienist noticed possible dental need at a school screening, you will also receive a phone call offering help to get care.

Questions?

Call White Bird Dental and mention the Bethel Friday clinics. 541-344-8302

Bethel Health Center is located inside Cascade Middle School. The entrance is on the north side of the building. Look for the awning.   1525 Echo Hollow Rd Suite A

 

Click on Link for Application: Whitebird Dental Permission Form- Eng

Spring is upon us – Does your child show signs of allergies and asthma???

Asthma and allergies are on the rise – Spring is upon us
Does your child show signs of asthma?
• Coughing with or without sickness
• Not able to ‘catch his/her breath’ after exercise
• ‘Whistling’ or ‘wheezing’ heard when breathing
• Cold air or temperature changes makes breathing worse
• Being in a smoky environment makes breathing worse
• Does your child sleep poorly because of his/her cough?
If your child has known asthma:
• Is the inhaler expired?
• Is your child using the inhaler more than 3-4 times a day
• Does your child’s cough make him/her vomit
• Remember these common triggers: exercise, smoke, pollen, dust, air pollution, animal fur, colds, flu and other respiratory infections
What should the parent do? Make a doctor’s appointment and work with your child’s physician to complete a plan, which should include: individualized information about your child’s asthma symptoms, daily medications, rescue inhaler or nebulizer treatments, any physical activity limitations or need for inhaler before strenuous activities, and specific instructions about what to do and whom to call if an asthma attack does not improve with medication. A free Asthma Action Plan form is available online at www.lungusa.org, or call 1-800-LUNG-USA for a copy.

*Please bring all medications to the school healthroom. Remember, a doctor’s order must be labeled clearly on the inhaler/medication bottle, and the parent must sign the medication form before it can be given.

Facts About Backpacks

Backpack basics for healthier kids

Facts about backpacks

Used correctly, backpacks can be a good way to carry all the books, supplies and personal items needed for a typical school day. Backpacks are designed to distribute the weight of the load among some of the body’s strongest muscles. However, backpacks that are too heavy or carried incorrectly can injure muscles or joints and contribute to back pain and other problems.

The proper backpack is:

  • No wider than the user’s chest
  • Worn no higher than the base of the neck
  • Worn no lower than 2 to 4 inches below the waist
  • Supported by a waist or a chest strap
  • Made of lightweight material

A good backpack has:

  • A padded back
  • Several compartments
  • Side compression straps
  • A waist or chest strap
  • Reflectors
  • Two wide, padded shoulder straps

How to use a backpack

To wear it

  • Facing the backpack, bend your knees, hold the backpack with both hands, and straighten your knees to lift it to waist height.
  • Apply one shoulder strap at a time.
  • Be sure to always use both shoulder straps.
  • Snugly adjust it between your neck and the curve of your lower back using the shoulder straps (the closer the backpack is to your body, the less strain it will cause).

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What do I put in my student’s lunch box instead of peanut butter??

What do I put in my student’s lunch box instead of peanut butter?

 

It may seem that there is nothing else that he/she will eat. Keep an open mind and be creative. Include your student in planning, purchasing and preparing a healthful lunch.  Kids are often more likely to try a new food if they help prepare it.  You can research new recipes together in books or on the computer.  Listed below are a few ideas.

 

Sandwiches:

  • Lean meat and/or cheese (try something “new”…turkey, cream cheese and cranberry sauce)
  • Cream cheese and jelly or jam
  • Refried beans (add corn, olives, cheese, etc.)
  • Additions:       lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers (maybe even sprouts!!)

 

Place fillings in whole wheat bread, bagels, pita or pocket breads, corn tortilla shells or flat wraps.

Kids can also be creative and cut sandwiches into shapes with cookie cutters and then make designs with dried and fresh fruit (such as raisins and mandarin oranges).

 

Ants on a log: Celery sticks with cream cheese and raisins.

 

Apple Sandwich:  Core and slice an apple crosswise.  Make a sandwich with the apples, using cheddar or ricotta cheese in the middle.

 

Chilled pasta salad:  Make a chilled pasta salad with your choice of pasta shape and color, the dressing of your choice, and one of the following combinations:

  • Thinly sliced carrots, snow peas, cucumbers, and tomatoes
  • Broccoli and tuna or ham chunks
  • Zucchini, broccoli, cherry tomatoes, and lima beans or frozen green peas
  • Chicken and snow peas
  • Corn and lima beans
  • Anything else you can think of…..be creative!

 

Veggies and dip:  Cut up vegetables, such as celery, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, and cucumbers and pack with a container of dressing or dip.

 

Chicken and apple salad:  Cut an apple into chunks; add chicken cubes, seedless grapes, and celery.

 

Thermos ideas:

  • Pasta and sauce
  • Chicken, bean or vegetable soup (again….be creative!)
  • Rice with beans/meat and veggies and add the sauce of your choice (cajun, teriyaki, etc.)
  • Thinly cooked potatoes with peas and carrots. Add meat slices or bacon pieces.